Brain Fog, Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS

by Cinda Crawford on October 18, 2013

in Brain Fog,Health Matters Shows

Brain-fog-confused-7658298768-FlickrWhen I write about brain fog, Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS as a topic, it garners a lot of attention and rightfully so. Brain fog is one horrible symptom! People with many illnesses exhibit cognitive impairment, but I’m especially familiar with how Fibro and ME/CFS folks suffer.

Symptoms can range from confusion to memory loss, to disorientation spatially and geographically to speech problems. And surely there’s more. *You’re welcome to add all info in the comment field below.

As a matter of fact, it’s one of the most long-lasting symptoms of both these illnesses, especially if inflammation and immune system dysfunction allowed brain damage to set in and become permanent. That’s the case with me. I had four bad viruses when I got ME/CFS and surely one of them (if not all four) was the culprit to me being forever a sufferer with cognitive impairment and brain fog.

Listen to today’s podcast and see if you don’t recognize some of your own fears about being able to function in a competitive world and have brain fog at the same time. Even when you have Fibromyalgia, people look at you strangely when you forget some common piece of knowledge. They wonder if you know what you’re talking about. When you mispronounce words, they wonder if you have a speech impediment. When you get mixed up, will they have patience with you and understand that you can’t help your jumbled memory? Do they think you’re dumb???


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More than once I’ve been humiliated by brain fog and all that goes along with it. Add the additional element of stress and you may not be able to communicate at all! Whether you sound like a babbling idiot or you have that terminally blank look in your eyes, your family, friends and co-workers need to understand that you’re doing the best you can do.

Take the time to listen to today’s podcast as I reveal some never-heard-before facts about my own brain fog and cognitive impairment. No matter your illness, if you suffer with this problem, too, I believe you’ll be able to relate. And then it’s really important to leave your comment below. That lets other folks know that they are not alone. If you have some tips for dealing with brain fog, share them. We’re all in this together.

Have a great day!
Cinda Crawford, your host of the Health Matters Show

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

1

Cinda Crawford 10.24.13 at 12:34 pm

Check out this link about brain fog (copy & paste this address in a new browser window) http://www.frontiersin.org/integrative_physiology/10.3389/fphys.2013.00063/abstract

2

Deborah ODazier 11.09.13 at 12:29 am

When I start fumbling my words, and forgetting words and names I know like one of my kids names etc. I quickly remind whomever is in my presence that it’s NORMAL for me to draw a blank when anyone or anything begins to stress my emotions IE it’s all part of the disease

3

Cinda Crawford 11.14.13 at 5:13 pm

Wow…do I agree with that! Under stress of most any kind, word searching and memory functions in general are much slower and harder to access. If I remove myself from the stress “source”, take a few deep breaths and allow myself to remember at my own speed, the information will come back to me quicker and usually easier. Hope this info from Deborah and me helps other folks who feel so despondent when their memory is not working up to par.

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